An Ambitious Architectural Vision Transcends The Durability Of This 1868 Pied-À-Terre

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When architect Lukas Rungger first encountered a client’s Pied-à-Terre in a historic building in Paris, he didn’t envision putting a round peg in a square hole. But when they mentioned the perfect design and durability of a nautilus shell, this founder of NOA* Network of Architecture envisioned a design opportunity.

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When Rungger was commissioned to design the second-floor unit that overlooks the courtyard, it was completely bare except for a load-bearing wall and a large welcoming door. Now, this L-shaped room exudes a swirling energetic flow, reflecting the beautiful patterned spirals of a nautilus shell. Rungger’s approach allowed the unit, which was originally part of a royal household in the 1600s, to flow and meet the needs of a modern family who often travels to Paris for work in the fashion industry, but who lives in Italy.

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“The owners were fascinated by geometry and pure clean lines,” notes Rungger. “We found a way to translate this passion into the design.”

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The nautilus pattern becomes an architectural element throughout the apartment. From the bleached oak floors that are set in a french herringbone pattern to the oak staircase with a double curvature, the living spaces unfold naturally.

Photography by Antoine Huot.

For more like this Paris Pied-à-Terre, be sure to check out this revised apartment in the Opéra District.

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